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Free Apartments & Millionaire TEFL Salaries!

One of the biggest perks of getting a TEFL job in South Korea is the free accommodation provided by almost every employer.  This combined with good salaries (£1500 per month*), ridiculously cheap eating out and a beer in a bar only costing £1.30 means it’s a teaching hotspot for TEFL teachers looking to save cash! So, you’re sold on South Korea…but before you sign that first job contract – let’s find out what that free accommodation really looks like**.

Yep, that’s your kitchen! Tiny though it is, it should have all the essentials that you need (multitasking rice cooker/casserole maker anyone?!)…but if you’d prefer, eating out is also cheap, tasty and easy – with a restaurant on almost every street corner.

Even though it’s somewhat traditional for Koreans to sleep on the floor, employers have now wised up to the fact that westerners prefer a bed and most will supply a double!

Welcome to your bathroom! Strange though it may look, an open plan wet room with an unenclosed shower can actually become quite a boon when it comes to cleaning.  Toilets might have heated seats, fake flush noises to ‘protect modesty’, automatic flushes and adjustable water jets!

Most apartments will also have a small living area with a table, chairs a sofa and a TV. Yes…the fridge is in the living room – we didn’t say this guide would make sense.

So, are you all ready for your TEFL adventure to South Korea? If so then take a look at the Free South Korea TEFL Guide to find out even more information about the country that spawned Gangnam Style..Op op op op…so darn catchy.

*£1500 per month is equal to about 2.4 million won – see we weren’t lying to you!

**All pictures provided by  teacher Kat from her apartment in Ulsan, South Korea. Your individual experiences may vary (maybe you’ll end up with a penthouse at the Hilton)!

 

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  • Martin Smith

    How about the actual teaching experience? I had heard that it was frequently somewhat regimented with little scope for creativity from the Foreign teacher….
    And with no Sundays (commercialized everything) how do you occasionally find peace? Do you go out into the remoter areas?

  • i-to-i

    Hi Martin, Thanks for taking the time to comment :). It really depends on where you work – whilst I was in Korea I found that private academies tended to have a more formal curriculum to follow whereas public schools give you a concept and tend to let you lesson plan yourself. However, this isn’t always the case and in some academies you’ll be doing a lot of the lesson planning too! As there are no ‘Sundays’ as such, many Koreans (and foreigners) go out in to the country or hike in the local mountains for some peace and quiet!

  • itoitefl

    Hi Martin, Thanks for taking the time to comment :). It really depends
    on where you work – whilst I was in Korea I found that private academies
    tended to have a more formal curriculum to follow whereas public
    schools give you a concept and tend to let you lesson plan yourself.
    However, this isn’t always the case and in some academies you’ll be
    doing a lot of the lesson planning too! As there are no ‘Sundays’ as
    such, many Koreans (and foreigners) go out in to the country or hike in
    the local mountains for some peace and quiet!

  • Tracey Levy

    I REALLY REALLY REALLY want to work in South Korea but I don’t have a degree :’(